Documents: 59, displayed: 1 - 20

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Appenzell, Landesarchiv Appenzell Innerrhoden, E.10.00.07
Paper · VI + 247 pp. · 21 x 16.5 cm · around 1700
Chronicles on the Reformation and on the division of the canton

On 123 paper pages, this codex contains copies of seven chronicles on the Reformation in the region of Appenzell as well as on the division of the canton in the 16th century. The codex was compiled around 1700 by an unknown scribe. (geg)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Basel, Pharmazie-Historisches Museum der Universität Basel, Cod. H25
Paper · 86 [+ 6] pp. · 15 x 19 cm · 1726
Schoop Johann, "Recept-Büchlein, Allerhand kostbar Wasser zuo distilliern" (Recipe-Booklet, All kinds of precious water to distill)

This booklet contains a collection of recipes for producing medications, home remedies and foodstuffs. The presentation of the recipes ranges from lists of ingredients to detailed texts that describe the processing of the ingredients. The manuscript does not have an index. A page from a manuscript - probably 14th century - serves as book cover. Its visible text is about the geometry of triangles (De triangulo). In the first half of the 20th century, the book was purchased at the bookstore Helbing & Lichtenhahn by Theo Baeschlin and then donated to the Pharmaceutical Institute of Basel. (wan)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Basel, Pharmazie-Historisches Museum der Universität Basel, Cod. H37
Paper · 120 ff. · 16 x 23 cm · 1582
Johannes Drexell, Collection of medical treatises

This collection is contained in a paper manuscript that originated in Switzerland. Later it received a binding of wooden boards covered in blind-tooled pigskin leather. The collection contains treatises and recipes based on the Practica of Meister Bartholomäus. The herbalism follows the tradition of Macer. The collection also contains rules for bloodletting, a treatise on the plague, menstruation and the like. In addition, various diseases are covered, such as those of the head, of the ears and the like. In general, the text collects treatises on the nature of women, on the four elements and the natures, and it gives veterinary advice based, among others, on Meister Albrecht’s pharmacopeia for horses. It also contains various blessings (blessings against arrows, blood loss and worms). Incantations as well as formulas for women in labor and more. (wan)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Basel, Pharmazie-Historisches Museum der Universität Basel, Cod. H45
Paper · 140 [+ 3] ff. · 14 x 21 cm · 1449
Ars hermetis

This manuscript was written or compiled by Johannes of Fulda in 1440. In 1953 it was donated to the museum by Dr. S. Merian. It had been the property of Jakob Burckhardt. The text is about medical alchemy. (wan)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Basel, Pharmazie-Historisches Museum der Universität Basel, Cod. H52
Paper · 196 ff. · 11 x 16 cm · 1651
Ross: und für Andere Sachen Artzney Büchli (Ross: and for other things Artzney Büchli)

In his medical compilation for animals, Carolus von Wattenwyl collects recipes of medications for equine diseases (Ross). These range from lack of appetite to an imbalance in the amount of bile. Ff. 95r-99v are written in a different French hand. This excursus explains how to remove various kinds of grease stains from horse riding clothes (title: "pour oster toutes sortes de tasches de graisse des habits"). In the course of the book, the handwriting changes two more times. (wan)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, AN I 8
Parchment and paper · 385 ff. · ca. 38 x 27 cm · 13th century
Elias Cretensis, Commentarius in S. Gregorii Nazianzeni orationes

Famous for the two portraits of Gregory of Nazianzus and Elias of Crete, as well as for a unique cycle of illustrations in honor of Gregory (of which 5 have been lost), this codex is also noteworthy for its content (19 commentaries by Elias of Crete, still unpublished in Greek) and for the story of its creation. The commentaries were copied around the end of the 12th or the beginning of the 13th century, a project that did not provide for miniatures on the frontispiece. These were added a short time later, together with a prologue. The codex still retains the binding that was created in Constantinople between 1435 and 1437 during a restoration for its new owner, the Dominican John of Ragusa, who brought the codex to Basel in 1437. (and)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, B II 5
Parchment · 233 ff. · 32.5 x 26 cm · St. Gall (?) · 10th and 11th century
Pauline Epistles · Sedulius Scottus · Final books of the New Testament

This manuscript originally consisted of three independent parts, dated to the 10th and 11th century. It contains Pauline Epistles, the glosses on the Pauline Epistles by Sedulius Scottus, as well as the final books of the New Testament. In the 15th century, Heinrich Gügelin of Rheinfelden, chaplain and provost at the Cathedral of Basel, donated this book to an unspecified Basel monastery. (stu)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, F III 15a
Parchment · 32 ff. · 25 x 19 cm · Fulda · 8th / 9th century
Isidorus Hispalensis · Register of Books of the Monastery of Fulda · Recipes · Blessings · Astronomic Tables · Jerome

One of the Isidore codices from the Monastery of Fulda; the codex escaped destruction because it reached Basel during the 16th century, before the abduction and destruction of the library during the Thirty Years' War. There it apparently was to serve as a textual source for a planned edition of Isidore’s works. This codex was created in Fulda at the end of the 9th century and still retains its Carolingian binding in a parchment cover. In addition to the works of Isidore, it contains the oldest catalog of the Fulda library, the so-called Basel recipes in Old High German, and an astronomic-computistic cycle of illustrations. (stu)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Basel, Universitätsbibliothek, O I 10
Parchment · 369 ff. · 29 x 21.5 cm · 3rd quarter of the 15th century
Composite manuscript (Theology)

This composite manuscript of theological content originally belonged to the patrician family Gossembrot of Augsburg (late 15th century); via Johannes Oporin († 1568), Eusebius Merz († 1616) and Remigius Faesch († 1667), it finally became part of the university library of Basel in 1823. Except for a single remaining woodcut, various miniatures and woodcuts pasted into the manuscript have been torn out. (stu)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Bulle, Musée gruérien, 382
Parchment · 56 ff. · 20 x 14 cm · first half of the 13th century
Collectarium cartusianum

Composite manuscript of liturgical texts, containing the prayers of the breviary of the Carthusian Order (1r Capitula, 18r Temporale, 35v Sanctorale, 49v Commune Sanctorum und 51v Usus communis). This small prayer book was probably produced in a Carthusian monastery in Burgundy in the 13th century. Certainly it was used from the 13th to about the 15th century in one of the Carthusian monasteries in present-day Western Switzerland, such as La Valsainte, La Part-Dieu or La Lance. The text is written on parchment and is decorated with blue and red paragraph initials. There are notes and drawings in the margins. (def)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Bulle, Musée gruérien, 383
Parchment · 17 ff. · 18.3 x 13.5 cm · Italy (Verona) · 15th century
Ordo professionis et consecrationis sanctimonialium (Verona, Monastery of San Michele di Campagna OSB, 15th century)

This small liturgical book was used in the Monastery of San Michele di Campagna near Verona during the 15th century. The work contains the rite of the profession of faith and of the consecration practiced on the occasion of the investiture of a Benedictine nun. It is valuable evidence of a ritual for women who take their vows. (def)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Bulle, Musée gruérien, 384
Parchment · [1] + 62 + [1] ff. · 19.2 x 13.5 cm · 13th century
Tancredus Bononiensis, Ordo iudiciarius

The Ordo iudiciarius is a work of canon law written at the beginning of the 13th century by Tancred of Bologna (ca. 1185-ca. 1236): f. 60r Explicit ordo iudiciaris magistri Tancreti. Tancred was archdeacon and professor at the University of Bologna. (def)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Bulle, Musée gruérien, 386
Paper · [15] + 238 + [27] pp. · 14 x 19 cm · 4.10.1675-10.11.1688
Rentier domestique de moy Joannes Castella bourgeois de Frybourg et Chastellain de la Ville de Gruyère

The first 14 pages of this urbarium consist of various notes regarding oaths and contracts. Page 15 constitutes the frontispiece of the register as such: ‟Ici commence mon rentier domestique, cet assavoir de moÿ Joannes Castella, bourgeois de Frÿbourg et chastellain de la ville de Gruÿere, le 3me janvier 1681”. This booklet lists all of Jean Castella’s expenditures (ordinary expenses such as saddle girths, wages paid to a midwife, purchase of wood, etc., as well as less ordinary expenses) along with receipts and, in particular, details regarding his income from lands. The author also notes down judgments in which he participated as a jury member or as guarantor for the authorities. In addition he mentions gifts that he received or gave. The register lists costs of and earnings from his official function as well as expenditures and income from his private activities. This is nothing less than a historical summary of the everyday life of a notable Gruyère citizen from the late 17th century. (def)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Bulle, Musée gruérien, sans cote
Paper · 186 ff. · 31 x 21 cm · 1565-1566
Property inventory from the Broc Priory

Inventory of property, prepared by the notary Michel d'Enney on behalf of Peter of Gruyère, Prior of Broc, and written between November 17, 1565 and November 20, 1566. The register consists of records of the properties of Broc Priory, organized by location. Originally Broc Priory was a dependency of the one at Lutry; in 1577 it was annexed to the Cathedral Chapter of St. Nicholas in Fribourg. (def)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, Cod. Bodmer 708
Paper · 82 ff. · 21 x 31 cm · Northern India, likely around Kedarnath · between 1700 and 1800, likely towards 1800
Kedārakalpa

This is an 18th century manuscript of the text called Kedārakalpa, representing itself as a part of the Nandīpurāṇa. The manuscript describes and depicts in its 61 exquisite miniature paintings a religious pilgrimage in Himalayas, Kedarnath region, as done by a group of yogis. It is a śaiva text, i.e. main deity is god Śiva, and the main purpose of the text is to incite people to go on that sacred śaiva pilgrimage. (ser)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, B-24.1
Paper · 2 pp. · 23 x 19 cm · n.d. [Paris, around January 1797]
Pierre-Augustin Caron de Beaumarchais, Pour Mr La Rochelle jouant Brid’oison. En cas de bruit à la fin, signed autograph

The comedy The Mad Day, or The Marriage of Figaro is a vivid satire of society during the Ancien Régime and of aristocratic privileges; it was first performed on April 27, 1784 and presaged the beginning of the French Revolution, which it doubtlessly helped bring about. After the fall of the monarchy in 1792, the comedy was again performed on several Parisian stages, albeit the concluding songs were modified by Beaumarchais. The final stanza of the stuttering judge Don Gusman Brid’oison, which in 1784 had concluded Tout fini-it par des chansons, was adapted to the difficulties of the period: Pour tromper sa maladie, / Il [the people] chantoit tout l’opera : / Dame ! il n’sait plus qu’ce p’tit air-là : / Ca ira, ça ira... However, after the fall of Robespierre and the Thermidorian Reaction, these words roiled young Muscadins just as the previous ones had caused the Sansculottes to react. Since the performances were disrupted by such turbulent audiences, Beaumarchais entrusted La Rochelle, the actor who performed the role of Brid’Oison, with an alternative ending that could be recited en cas de bruit (in case of noise). This variant, which remained unpublished until recently, was a praise of freedom of speech and of the sang froid de la raison (the cold blood of reason) against the stratagème (wiles) of ideological cabals. (duc)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, F-16.1
Paper · 4 pp. · 23 x 34.6 cm · 1851
Gustave Flaubert, Le Chant de la Courtisane, autograph

Despite visible erasures, this is the completed version of this untitled text, which consists of six paragraphs on two leaves, bound in red Morocco leather. At the earliest it was written by Flaubert during his voyage to the Orient (1849-1851) with his friend Maxime du Camp, although it seems more likely to date from his return to France in 1851, the moment he dedicated his life to writing. Later know by the title Le Chant de la Courtisane, this prose poem in a humorous tone was not published by Flaubert himself. Nonetheless, it sums up his challenges as a writer: the work shows the author’s fascination with Oriental culture and landscape, which he hopes to to reproduce in a realistic manner. A journal of his voyage, which records his observations and sensations and directly feeds his fictional work. The vocabulary reveals a certain erudition and a concern for accuracy, procedures which herald Salammbô. This manuscript, from the collection of Paul Voute (who had published a facsimile thereof in 1928), was purchased by Martin Bodmer at the Blaizot bookstore. (exq)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, F-16.3
Paper · 46 pp. · 22.5 x 35 cm · 1858
Gustave Flaubert, explanatory chapter from Salammbô, autograph

Mentioned in his correspondence by Flaubert as an explanatory chapter to Salammbô, this manuscript consists of 28 leaves, which are all numbered, except for the last one that contains notes regarding the gods. The manuscript is in a folder on which Flaubert noted the work’s title as well as a date, 1857, that corresponds with the beginning of the writing of Salammbô. This chapter, however, was written after 1857: it was actually conceived after an important documentation phase indispensable to the project and after a trip to Carthage. Upon his return in 1858, the writer worked on a chapter that would be “the topographical and picturesque description of the aforementioned city, with a portrayal of the people who inhabited it, including the traditional costume, government, religion, finances and commerce, etc." (Letter to J. Duplan, dated 1 July 1858). Despite a certain number of corrections and marginal additions, this is the completed version of the text, which ultimately was removed from the novel, even though information therefrom was scattered throughout the work. This chapter reveals the way the author works. He is distinguished by his encyclopedic erudition and his attention to detail, which shed light on the original challenges in the creation of Salammbô: that of reconstructing the then-lost city of Carthage. In November 1949, Martin Bodmer purchased this manuscript at the Blaizot bookstore. (exq)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, M-48.1
Paper · 1 f. · 13.5 x 10.5 cm · not dated
John Stuart Mill, Note on Freedom of Speech, signed autograph

Following enlightenment philosophers, liberal thinkers - which include Mill - considered freedom of speech a fundamental human right. In this small autograph, with embossed monogram "JSM", consisting of three folios intended for dispatch, the philosopher copies a passage of his famous "On Liberty" from 1869, taken from chapter II: "Of the Liberty of Thought and Discussion." Mill emphasizes that humankind no more has the right to silence a single opinion than it has the right to silence all of humankind, if it had the power to do so. Before it became the property of Martin Bodmer, this letter had been purchased by the author Stefan Zweig in 1923. (giv)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

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Cologny, Fondation Martin Bodmer, R-49.1
Paper · 1 f. · 18 x 12 cm · not dated [ca. 1764]
Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Lettres écrites de la montagne (Letter VII), second draft, autograph

The Lettres écrites de la montagne are the last work that was published during Rousseau’s lifetime. For the first time, the philosopher becomes directly involved in the affairs of Geneva. Beyond fundamental proposals, the letters contain further developed thoughts on the spirit of the Reformation as well as a defense of the Contrat Social. Letter VII, where this page comes from, supports the right of representation when it comes to correcting abuses of the Small Council, and it recommends that citizens convened in the General Council reject all new elections of magistrates if these should insist upon overstepping the rights given them by the Constitution. The Lettres were censored in Geneva as well as in Paris. This document is from the collection of Ch. Vellay (purchased by Martin Bodmer in 1926) and contains a draft of two passages from the Lettres. The first of these was published in the original edition (Amsterdam, M. M. Rey, 1764), the second in the edition of the Œuvres complètes of the Bibliothèque de la Pléiade. (giv)

Online Since: 06/22/2017

Documents: 59, displayed: 1 - 20