Handschrift in dieser Sammlung wählen: B26  B284 B288  S58  39/80
Standortland:
Standortland
Schweiz
Ort:
Ort
Zürich
Bibliothek / Sammlung:
Bibliothek / Sammlung
Braginsky Collection
Signatur:
Signatur
B285
Handschriftentitel:
Handschriftentitel
Haggada mit Kommentaren (Hijman Binger Haggadah)
Schlagzeile:
Schlagzeile
Pergament · 52 ff. · 30.4 x 19.7 cm · Amsterdam, kopiert und illustriert von Hijman Binger · 1796
Sprache:
Sprache
Hebräisch
Kurzcharakterisierung:
Kurzcharakterisierung
Die Hijman Binger Haggada ist ein typisches Beispiel der hebräischen Handschriftenkunst Zentral- und Nordeuropas Ende des 18. und Anfang des 19. Jahrhunderts. Bilderzyklen untermalen die geschriebenen Inhalte. Die Illustrationen weisen Ähnlichkeiten mit späteren Haggadoth von Joseph ben David von Leipnik, wie dieser von 1739 (Braginsky Collection ‬B317) auf und legen die Vermutung nahe, dass eine andere Haggada dieses Künstlers Hijman Binger als Vorbild diente. Eine weitere Rarität dieser Handschrift ist eine Karte des Heiligen Landes, die ganz am Schluss angefügt wurde (f. 52). (red)
DOI (Digital Object Identifier):
DOI (Digital Object Identifier
10.5076/e-codices-bc-b-0285 (http://dx.doi.org/10.5076/e-codices-bc-b-0285)
Permalink:
Permalink
http://www.e-codices.ch/de/list/one/bc/b-0285
IIIF Manifest URL:
IIIF Manifest URL
IIIF Drag-n-drop http://www.e-codices.ch/metadata/iiif/bc-b-0285/manifest.json
Wie zitieren:
Wie zitieren
Zürich, Braginsky Collection, B285: Haggada mit Kommentaren (Hijman Binger Haggadah) (http://www.e-codices.ch/de/list/one/bc/b-0285).
Online seit:
Online seit
19.03.2015
Externe Ressourcen:
Externe Ressourcen
Rechte:
Rechte
Bilder:
(Hinsichtlich aller anderen Rechte, siehe die jeweilige Handschriftenbeschreibung und unsere Nutzungsbestimmungen)
Annotationswerkzeug - Anmelden

e-codices · 20.03.2015, 16:22:33

Hijman (Hayyim ben Mordecai) Binger (1756–1830) is best known for a decorated daily prayer book, now in the Bibliotheca Rosenthaliana (Hs. Ros. 681) in Amsterdam, which he executed in cooperation with his sons, Marcus and Anthonie, in 1820. He also copied numerous single-leaf manuscripts of contemporary poetry, mostly for family occasions, which are now housed in various collections worldwide. Binger began his career as a bookkeeper, but later worked primarily in a clothing rental business; he also may have been active in international trading. In 1827 he inherited a lending library from his brother, Meijer Binger, to which he devoted most of his time.
Both the above-mentioned prayer book and the Hijman Binger Haggadah typify Hebrew manuscript decoration in Central and Northern Europe at the end of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth centuries. The previous flowering of Hebrew manuscript ornamentation and illustration started to decline around the middle of the eighteenth century. With few exceptions, notably a number of late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth century examples from Hungary (such as cat. no. 54), the Bouton Haggadah (cat. no. 56) and the Charlotte von Rothschild Haggadah (cat. no. 55), most later works randomly copied iconographic and stylistic elements from the vast tradition of the preceding centuries. As a result, the later manuscripts lack the internal consistency and relative unity of style of the earlier examples.
In light of similarities between the illustrations in the Hijman Binger Haggadah and those in some of the later Haggadot executed by Joseph ben David of Leipnik, for example, the Rosenthaliana Leipnik Haggadah of 1738 and a Leipnik Haggadah from 1739 (cat. no. 45), it is likely that a Haggadah by this artist served as Binger’s primary model. The inclusion of a Hebrew map of the Holy Land, printed in the Amsterdam Haggadah of 1695, though not unique to eighteenth-century manuscripts, may well be considered a rarity.

From: A Journey through Jewish Worlds. Highlights from the Braginsky collection of Hebrew manuscripts and printed books, hrsg. E. M. Cohen, S. L. Mintz, E. G. L. Schrijver, Amsterdam, 2009, p. 142.

Eine Annotation hinzufügen
Annotationswerkzeug - Anmelden

A Journey through Jewish Worlds. Highlights from the Braginsky collection of Hebrew manuscripts and printed books, hrsg. E. M. Cohen, S. L. Mintz, E. G. L. Schrijver, Amsterdam, 2009, p. 142-143.

Eine bibliographische Angabe hinzufügen

Referenzbilder und Einband

Vorderseite
Vorderseite
Rückseite
Rückseite